Tag Archives: Jeremiah

Choosing to Trust

I’ve been thinking about trust lately. It has been said that trust must be earned, and that once lost it is hard to regain. But it occurs to me that trust is a choice, and that sometimes we must choose to trust even when it isn’t earned.

I decided to check The Quotable Lewis to see what C.S. Lewis had to say on the subject of trust and I found this little gem:

To love involves trusting the beloved beyond the evidence, even against much evidence. No man is our friend who believes in our good intentions only when they are proved. No man is our friend who will not be very slow to accept evidence against them. Such confidence, between one man and another, is in fact almost universally praised as a moral beauty, nor blamed as a logical error. And the suspicious man is blamed for a meanness of character, not admired for the excellence of his logic.
C.S. Lewis, The World’s Last Night, “On Obstinacy in Belief” (1955), p. 26.

It seems that Lewis agrees with my thought that trust is a choice. (I always love it when I discover that Lewis and I agree on something.)

We choose to trust God in spite of the lack of absolute proof that He exists and is on our side. In the face of tragedy and the existence of evil in this world, we choose to trust God to have our greater good as His chief aim. We choose to trust “that in all things God works for the good of those who love him, who have been called according to his purpose.” Romans 8:28 (NIV). We trust God because we believe that He is inherently trustworthy.

But to live we must trust others as well. There would be no basis for a civilized society without some degree of trust. Such trust can be difficult because experience and scripture often tell us that humans are inherently untrustworthy. The prophet Jeremiah observed that, “The heart is deceitful above all things and beyond cure. Who can understand it?” Jeremiah 17:9 (NIV).

In spite of evidence of untrustworthiness all around us, we must trust someone. So we also choose to trust our spouse, our family, and our close friends; we choose to trust those we love, because as Lewis says, “love involves trusting.” Sometimes we encounter evidence that suggests even our closest beloved family and friends are untrustworthy—not surprising, since they are human. It is then that we face the real choice: to continue to trust or to give up on love.

It occurs to me that this is the point at which we must really examine the situation with a critical eye—not critical of others, but critical of our own hearts. If we can honestly say that we have always been trustworthy ourselves, perhaps we can justifiably decide to give up on love and choose to no longer trust. But I suspect that none of us can honestly reach that conclusion. To do so in and of itself is evidence of our own untrustworthiness. As the apostle John wrote, “If we claim to be without sin, we deceive ourselves and the truth is not in us.” 1 John 1:8 (NIV). If we think we are inherently more trustworthy than our loved ones, we deceive ourselves.

One thing we can be sure of, though, is that we do not deceive God for He alone fully knows our untrustworthiness. “People look at the outward appearance, but the Lord looks at the heart.” 1 Samuel 16:7b (NIV).

This day you and I must choose. Will we trust God, who is unequaled in His trustworthiness? If we do, then we are free to choose to also trust our loved ones because we know that God is in control and will bless our choice with His grace and love.

5 Comments

Filed under Faith, Family, Jesus, Life

Why I Share the Gospel

The word Gospel means Good News. I love to share the Good News that God loves us. And yet I’ve been asked why I am compelled to share this Good News with those who don’t believe. Why can’t I just leave them alone to believe whatever they choose?

The easy answer is that in scripture God commands us to share the Gospel. Jesus told His disciples, “Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you.” Matthew 28:19-20 (NIV). For many Christians this is all the reason they need.

Another reason for sharing the Gospel is because we want our loved ones to spend eternity in heaven. I wrote about this reason in a previous post titled The Hardest Thing. For many Christians this is the primary reason.

But as I’ve pondered this week why I personally share the love of Jesus, I realized it goes much deeper than that. The other night I was reading in one of my devotionals before bed and was reminded of a passage in Jeremiah that illustrates the reason why I desire to share the Gospel with others. This passage is from Jeremiah 17:5-8 (NIV):

This is what the Lord says:

“Cursed is the one who trusts in man,
who depends on flesh for his strength
and whose heart turns away from the Lord.
He will be like a bush in the wastelands;
he will not see prosperity when it comes.
He will dwell in the parched places of the desert,
in a salt land where no one lives.

“But blessed is the man who trusts in the Lord,
whose confidence is in him.
He will be like a tree planted by the water
that sends out its roots by the stream.
It does not fear when heat comes;
its leaves are always green.
It has no worries in a year of drought
and never fails to bear fruit.”

This passage is very similar to Psalm 1:1-3 (NIV), which says:

Blessed is the man
who does not walk in the counsel of the wicked
or stand in the way of sinners
or sit in the seat of mockers.
But his delight is in the law of the Lord,
and on his law he meditates day and night.
He is like a tree planted by streams of water,
which yields its fruit in season
and whose leaf does not wither.
Whatever he does prospers.

The reason I share the Gospel is because having a relationship with Jesus Christ has made me like a tree planted by streams of water.

I used to be a huge worrier and every little difficulty in life would throw me for a loop. Life was hard and I was more like a bush in the wastelands. There were times when things seemed good, but it never seemed to last and the smallest challenge would seem insurmountable.

But now, with Christ in my life, I can face the challenges of each day. From an objective perspective my life hasn’t gotten that much easier, but my ability to weather the storms that come my way is much different. When I experience a time of drought, I have a source of living water to sustain me.

I’ve known people who have gone through some of the most difficult challenges anyone can imagine, but because they know Jesus they have had the strength to endure and even prosper in spirit. I have a friend who lost her 6-year-old son to a sudden illness and then lost her husband to a brain tumor almost a year to the day later. For many, this type of loss would have been devastating. Yet because of her faith and the strength of her Savior Jesus, she was able to move on and focus on caring for her two other children.

I’ve known other people who are not Christians who struggle with every little challenge that comes their way and who are completely sidelined by bigger trials. They seem to have no anchor in the storms of life. Their focus remains on every bad thing that happens. They do okay when good things happen, but their happiness is short-lived. Having been like them at one point in my life, I feel compassion for their plight.

Which is why I want the peace and love of Jesus for others; it’s why I share the Gospel. The promise of eternity in heaven is one thing, but God’s promise of spiritual peace in spite of the circumstances of this life is so much more tangible and useful for those who need it.

2 Comments

Filed under Faith, Jesus, Life

Half the Truth Can Be a Lie

The other night my husband and I were at Costco and were just about to get in the check-out line. I noticed a woman looking at the coconut (the same coconut featured in my Toasted Coconut for Recipe Friday post), and I overheard her say to her daughters, “Oh, the second ingredient is sugar. There’s nothing good in that.”

For some reason I felt compelled to correct the error in her conclusion. I went over and pointed out that although sugar is indeed the second ingredient listed on the package, the nutrition information revealed that there is only 1 gram of sugar per serving but that there are also 14 grams of fiber. I was able to convince her that overall this was a pretty healthy snack, either right out of the bag or toasted. She did ultimately purchase a bag to try it.

(I think subconsciously my motive was to make sure people buy this coconut from Costco so they keep carrying it. But I digress.)

This woman looked only at the ingredients list on the coconut and not at the nutrition information panel. The ingredient list was accurate and true. Coconut was the first ingredient and sugar was the second, with a freshening agent being the third and last ingredient. But the list of ingredients was only half the truth because it didn’t reveal the proportion of each ingredient in a serving. Nor did the ingredient list reveal that this food is an excellent source of fiber, which is greatly lacking in the typical American diet.

I was thinking about this encounter the next day and it occurred to me that it is a great illustration both for life in general and for Biblical interpretation.

Quite often in life people make decisions or reach conclusions based on only part of the available information. We might look at how a person is dressed and reach conclusions about their values or intelligence without finding anything out about their personality or character. We might read the dust jacket of a book, or maybe even just the title, and conclude that it is not worth reading, missing out on the wisdom contained within its pages. We might learn that a company makes a huge profit in their business and conclude that the CEO and other officers are greedy and ruthless, without ever finding out that the company gives millions to help the needy each year.

When it comes to Biblical interpretation, people often take a single verse or passage as evidence that God is vengeful and full of hate, without ever having read the entire Bible to see the whole character of God. Others read a single verse or passage and determine that another person is a sinner and destined to perish in Hell, without considering the many passages that reveal that we are all sinners but that Christ came to save sinners and redeem us all. Others read a single verse or passage and determine that they are free to do whatever they please and that what they are doing is not sin, without considering the verses that reveal the holiness of God and that the purpose of the law is to reveal our need for a Savior.

Biblical interpretation that is based on only half the truth can be a lie.

Each verse and passage in the Bible is true and right, but can be construed in a way that ends in a lie if not considered in the whole of the Bible’s great story of mercy and grace. From creation to fall, from exile to restoration, from death to resurrected life, from beginning to end, the Bible reveals a coherent and complete truth of God’s relationship with and love for His creation.

The whole truth of the Bible is so much greater than any half-truth that you may have heard or read. Seek the whole truth and you will be blessed.

“Then you will call upon me and come and pray to me, and I will listen to you. You will seek me and find me when you seek me with all your heart. I will be found by you,” declares the LORD, “and will bring you back from captivity.” Jeremiah 29:12-14a (NIV).

5 Comments

Filed under Faith, Family, Jesus, Life

Four Truths to Remember

Today in church our Youth Minister Colie gave the sermon. We are still learning about our Christian Toolbox, and today’s tool was “service.” But I am not going to write about what she told us about service right now. (There will no doubt be more blog posts on this wonderful tool throughout this week.)

Instead, I want to share four truths that Colie shared with us at the beginning of her message. They are four truths that she heard a Christian speaker share at a conference earlier last week. But these four truths weren’t new with that speaker either. Their source is God and they are told to us in His Word.

  1. You are loved.

    But because of his great love for us, God, who is rich in mercy, made us alive with Christ even when we were dead in transgressions. Ephesians 2:4-5a (NIV). 

  2. You matter.

    “For I know the plans I have for you,” declares the LORD, “plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future.” Jeremiah 29:11 (NIV).

  3. You are chosen.

    But you are a chosen people, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, a people belonging to God, that you may declare the praises of him who called you out of darkness into his wonderful light. 1 Peter 2:9 (NIV).

  4. You are not alone.

And I will ask the Father, and he will give you another Counselor to be with you forever—the Spirit of truth. The world cannot accept him, because it neither sees him nor knows him. But you know him, for he lives with you and will be in you. I will not leave you as orphans; I will come to you. John 14:16-18 (NIV).

So the next time you think no one loves you because you haven’t done anything to earn the love of others, refute that lie with the truth that God loves you. The next time you think you are to insignificant to matter to anyone, refute that lie with the truth that God has a plan for your life that is perfectly suited to how He made you. The next time you are feeling lost and alone, remember that you have been chosen by God to belong to Him and that He has sent His Holy Spirit to dwell in you so that you will never be alone.

2 Comments

Filed under Faith, Jesus, Life

Focus on the Known

Some things in life are unknown. Right now I’m facing the unknown of health concerns. After multiple tests, doctors still don’t know what is causing recent symptoms. I do have a list of what it is not. Whenever a test reveals that it is not something else I’m told it is good news. And I know that for the most part it is. But the difficult news remains that we don’t know what it is.

I thought of this post this morning, but decided not to write it because, frankly, I get tired of complaining about my health. I know there are a lot of people worse off than me, and I’m sure it gets old for others to hear about my various maladies.

Then I went to my list of blog subscriptions to see what others had posted for today. I clicked on a post by one of my favorite bloggers, Karla over at Out of Eden Ministries. The post was called “at the beginning going low.” She starts with a discussion of how Rahab the prostitute appears in the genealogy of Jesus in Matthew 1:5, and goes on to talk about how God makes the insignificant into a significant part of His plan. Karla writes:

 Phone calls and prayers and prostitutes and a scarlet cord and you, yes you. Your life, your love, your pain, your prayer, and your hunger for more. All significant in the plans and the hands of God.

I immediately knew I had to write this post after all, because although it starts with my insignificant struggle with pain and its unknown cause, it doesn’t end there. It ends with a focus on the known. What I thought of to write for today was how, even though I don’t know what is wrong with me, God does. And even more importantly, I know the truth of what God has revealed in His Holy Word. Here are some truths that I cling to, that I choose to focus on, as I face my insignificant struggles.

And we know that in all things God works for the good of those who love him, who have been called according to his purpose. Romans 8:28 (NIV).

For our light and momentary troubles are achieving for us an eternal glory that far outweighs them all. 2 Corinthians 4:17 (NIV).

And the God of all grace, who called you to his eternal glory in Christ, after you have suffered a little while, will himself restore you and make you strong, firm and steadfast. 1 Peter 5:10 (NIV).

“For I know the plans I have for you,” declares the LORD, “plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future.” Jeremiah 29:11 (NIV).

My own struggles are light and momentary in the grand scheme of the universe and God’s plan. Though I will suffer a little while, Jesus will restore me and make me strong. He will use my sufferings for good in the big picture of His purpose. He has plans to prosper me spiritually, and He will faithfully fulfill this promise.

(You might be wondering why certain words are bolded in the above verses. These are the words I remember and that I used to find these verses on Biblegateway.com, since I seldom remember the actual chapter and verse of the scripture that I have stored up in my heart.)

Karla’s post made me realize that I needed to listen to the prompt in my spirit to post about my struggles and the known promises of God that I choose to focus on, because there just might be someone out there who is struggling too and needs to know that God is with them. If that happens to be you, then hold onto the promises of God and He will see you through.

17 Comments

Filed under Blogging, Faith, Jesus, Life

The Shepherd – A Poem

The other day I posted a “found poem” that my son wrote for his social studies class. After reading a bit about this form of poetry, I decided I wanted to try writing one. I thought of all the references to sheep and shepherds in the Bible and chose to focus on these references for my found poem. Biblegateway came in handy so that I could easily search and “find” the verses I wanted to include. I thought about including all of the scripture references as footnotes, but decided that would make the post too cluttered.

I’m posting this poem as my Thankful Thursday post because I am thankful that Jesus is our Good Shepherd. I am also thankful for the consistent theme of God as the shepherd of His lost and wandering sheep throughout the Bible.

The Shepherd

We all, like sheep, have gone astray,
each of us has turned to his own way;
Hear us, O Shepherd of Israel,
You who lead Joseph like a flock;
You who sit enthroned
between the cherubim.

Like a hunted gazelle, like sheep
without a shepherd,
each will flee to his native land.
Save your people and bless
your inheritance; be their shepherd
and carry them forever.

He had compassion on them,
because they were harassed and helpless,
like sheep without a shepherd.
This is what the Sovereign LORD says:
Woe to the shepherds of Israel
who only take care of themselves!

Should not shepherds take care of the flock?
The LORD is my shepherd,
I shall not be in want.
“I will place shepherds over them
who will tend them, and they will
no longer be afraid or terrified,
nor will any be missing,” declares the LORD.

Then I will give you shepherds
after my own heart, who will lead you
with knowledge and understanding.
They will follow my laws
and be careful to keep my decrees.
And David shepherded them
with integrity of heart;
with skillful hands he led them.

For you were like sheep
going astray, but now
you have returned to the Shepherd
and Overseer of your souls.
And when the Chief Shepherd appears,
you will receive the crown of glory
that will never fade away.

For the Lamb at the center
of the throne will be their shepherd;
He will lead them to springs
of living water. And God
will wipe away every tear from their eyes.
So the LORD’s people will not
be like sheep without a shepherd.

But you, Bethlehem, in the land of Judah,
out of you will come a ruler
who will be the shepherd of my people Israel.
“I have other sheep that are
not of this sheep pen. I must bring them also.
They too will listen to my voice,
and there shall be one flock and one shepherd.”

He will stand and shepherd
his flock in the strength of the LORD,
in the majesty of the name of the LORD
his God. And they will live securely,
for then his greatness will reach
to the ends of the earth.

“I am the good shepherd
who lays down his life for the sheep.”
He tends his flock like a shepherd:
He gathers the lambs in his arms
and carries them close to his heart;
and the LORD has laid on him
the iniquity of us all.

6 Comments

Filed under Faith, Jesus, Life, Poetry

The Dangers of Following Your Heart

In a few weeks I am going to a Casting Crowns concert with a friend. One of the opening bands is Sanctus Real. Since I wasn’t familiar with their music I decided to get their newest CD to listen to before the concert. The whole CD, called “Pieces of a Real Heart,” is pretty good. But as usually happens with a new CD one song in particular stood out for me. It’s called “Dear, Heart.” I found this great video of it on YouTube with cute stick figures.

This song reminded me of a passage from Jeremiah:

“The human heart is the most deceitful of all things,
      and desperately wicked.
      Who really knows how bad it is?
But I, the Lord, search all hearts
      and examine secret motives.
   I give all people their due rewards,
      according to what their actions deserve.”
Jeremiah 17:9-10 (NLT).

It got me thinking about how my own heart has led me into trouble, looking for love and happiness where it can’t be found. I know sometimes my heart fools me into thinking material possessions will provide happiness.

One thing that has been on my mind lately has been my jewelry collection. I like jewelry, a lot, and I own more than a person could possibly need. I even sometimes pride myself on getting jewelry for a good price. But jewelry doesn’t really provide me with the love and happiness I need to truly live. I’ve been wondering lately how I would feel if tomorrow it was all gone. I know that if I think I can’t live without it then I’ve let my heart deceive me.

Greater than all the jewels of the world is the love of Jesus, and no one can ever take that away from me. I pray that my desire for material possessions – jewelry or otherwise – never get between me and my God.

6 Comments

Filed under Faith, Jesus, Life, Music, postaday2011

To Be Despised by All but God

I’m working my way through Ezekiel in the Old Testament, and before that I read Jeremiah. These are challenging books to read and to apply to our daily lives. Here and there is a nugget with direct – and easy – application, but I think these books are there for a much bigger purpose. The Old Testament prophets show us what is important to God. As I read, I find that God is primarily concerned with two things:

  1. That His people trust in Him and not in idols of their own making. This seems reasonable, since He alone is trustworthy. An idol made of stone or gold – or as we often trust in these days, of paper in the form of money and stocks – cannot protect us or provide a sure and trustworthy future. Only God can do that.
  2. That His people care for the “widow and the orphan,” that is, the less fortunate of society who are in need of a helping hand. This seems reasonable, too, since those of us who have been blessed should not find it a burden to bless others in return.

These are simple principles. When asked what the greatest commandment was, Jesus echoed these two principles when He answered, “‘Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind.’ This is the first and greatest commandment. And the second is like it: ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’” Matthew 22:37-38 (NIV).

And yet the prophets were hated and ridiculed for telling the Israelites that they would suffer and were suffering exile and death, war and famine, because they failed to follow these two simple principles. Instead of loving and trusting the God who had seen them through so much and protected them, they trusted in idols and the ways of their neighbors. Instead of loving their neighbors and caring for the downtrodden, they cared only for their own gain and gluttony. The Israelites were warned over and over by the prophets. I believe that the message of the prophets – that these two principles are paramount – is just as relevant for our world today as it was for ancient Israel.

The other day I received this wonderful quote in my Quotemeal email from Heartlight.org. I believe it illustrates not only the struggle the Old Testament prophets faced, but also the struggle those who trust in Christ alone for salvation and seek to share His expectation that we love our neighbors with the world face today.

To be forged upon the anvil of God’s purpose, to be at once His hammer, His tongs, and His molten iron; to hear words that rend the heart, see visions that pierce the chest; to be emptied like an urn, again and again and again until one desires only rest, only an end to the refilling — and to know one cannot live without the refilling. To be given words that one dare not speak, and to feel those words churning and boiling in the belly until one must speak them aloud, or die. To be despised, soon or late, by everyone except Adonai — and to desire it so, while hating it. This is to be a prophet.
– Thom Lemmons

I’m not suggesting that I am a prophet, but there have been times in my life when I was compelled to speak, or to write, words I did not wish to say or write. I have had words churn and boil in my mind and in my heart, felt the fear of saying or writing them, but had to push through that fear and let those words fly and land wherever God desires.

Just writing that last paragraph makes it seem all so dramatic, but really it just is. Sometimes I don’t push through the fear and I fail to share the words that are on my heart. Although I have not yet died as a result, a small part of my spiritual growth does whither. Perhaps my faith would be stronger and more souls would have been saved if I had always spoken up.

But, in the end, I know that God loves me and knows I am being sanctified daily, though sometimes more slowly than I would like.

10 Comments

Filed under Faith, Jesus, Life, postaday2011

Dancing with Joy – My Tuesday Three

I was on vacation all last week and did not have any time to read blogs, not even my favorites. I managed to post every day only because most of those posts were written and scheduled before I left. So once again My Tuesday Three will not showcase three blog posts. I promise I will get back to that, but I am thankful for more flexibility in discerning My Tuesday Three.

Yesterday as I thought about what to write, I came across a post by my fellow blogger Pastor Bryan Lowe titled Just One More Dance to Go. It got me thinking about how much I love to dance, and how dancing for the Lord is the best dance of all. I know there are some Christian denominations that frown upon dancing, but the Bible clearly indicates that dancing with the right attitude towards God is a good thing.

King David is one of the great figures of the Old Testament, considered a man after God’s own heart. David loved the Lord and did what was right in His sight. Although David did sin, when confronted with his sin David repented and sought God’s forgiveness. Scripture has this to say about David and dancing:

David, wearing a linen ephod, danced before the LORD with all his might, while he and the entire house of Israel brought up the ark of the LORD with shouts and the sound of trumpets.

As the ark of the LORD was entering the City of David, Michal daughter of Saul watched from a window. And when she saw King David leaping and dancing before the LORD, she despised him in her heart. 2 Samuel 6:14-16 (NIV).

I have always found it interesting that the Scriptures record Michal’s reaction to David’s dancing. As I read this passage, I see that God was pleased with David but not with Michal. To me, Michal represents those who don’t truly know the joy of the Lord as David did, and so despise and are jealous of those who have that joy and can express it outwardly as in dancing. Although dancing is an outward activity, it is the attitude of the heart that is most important.

David’s son Solomon was another great figure of the Old Testament. He prayed for wisdom and was granted his prayer and more. He shared much of his wisdom in Proverbs and Ecclesiastes. One of the most well-known passages of Ecclesiastes also supports that dancing, at the appropriate time and with the right attitude, is a good thing.

A Time for Everything

There is a time for everything,
   and a season for every activity under heaven:

a time to be born and a time to die,
   a time to plant and a time to uproot,
a time to kill and a time to heal,
   a time to tear down and a time to build,
a time to weep and a time to laugh,
   a time to mourn and a time to dance,
a time to scatter stones and a time to gather them,
   a time to embrace and a time to refrain,
a time to search and a time to give up,
   a time to keep and a time to throw away,
a time to tear and a time to mend,
   a time to be silent and a time to speak,
a time to love and a time to hate,
   a time for war and a time for peace.

Ecclesiastes 3:1-8 (NIV).

Although I love to dance, I know that it is not always appropriate. One does not dance at a funeral or in a courtroom. One does not dance in history class or on the front lines of war. But when it is time to celebrate the blessings of the Lord such as a wedding or the birth of a child or the offer of a new job, then it is appropriate to dance. Even during a worship service in church I believe it can be appropriate to praise the Lord with dance. There is nothing cuter than to see a small child dancing in the aisle during an upbeat song at church.

Someday dancing before the Lord will be appropriate for all as we celebrate the blessings of the new heaven and new earth. The Old Testament prophet Jeremiah wrote of a time when the Lord would return all of His people to Him, a time that is still yet to come.

For the LORD will ransom Jacob
   and redeem them from the hand of those stronger than they.
They will come and shout for joy on the heights of Zion;
   they will rejoice in the bounty of the LORD—
the grain, the new wine and the oil,
   the young of the flocks and herds.
They will be like a well-watered garden,
   and they will sorrow no more.
Then maidens will dance and be glad,
   young men and old as well.
I will turn their mourning into gladness;
   I will give them comfort and joy instead of sorrow.
Jeremiah 31:11-13 (NIV).

The Lord Jesus has already come to ransom Jacob (Israel). The time will come when all the children of Abraham, including the Gentiles who have been grafted in, will be gathered to the Lord. All “will dance and be glad.” Oh, what a dance that will be, filled with the joy of the Lord, when sorrow will be no more. That is the dance Pastor Bryan looks forward to in his post. It is the dance I look forward to as well. In the meantime, I’ll keep dancing with joy to celebrate the blessings of our God.

10 Comments

Filed under Blogging, Faith, Family, Jesus, Life, Music, postaday2011

Ancient Words, Ever True

At our Women’s Retreat this past weekend we sang the song “Ancient Words.” Then we sang it again in church on Sunday. I love this song and decided I wanted to share it for Music Monday. I found this version by Michael W. Smith on YouTube, and I love the graphics showing the different Bibles.

My favorite part of this song is when it says, “Ancient Words, ever true. Changing me and changing you.” It reminds me that spending time in God’s Word will change a person’s heart and will draw them closer to God.

Jeremiah 29:12-14a says:

“Then you will call upon me and come and pray to me, and I will listen to you. You will seek me and find me when you seek me with all your heart. I will be found by you,” declares the LORD, “and will bring you back from captivity.”

We are all in captivity to sin, but when we seek God with all our heart in His glorious Word, we will find Him and He will bring us back from that captivity. We are then changed from what we were to someone so much better. We are changed from lost captives to beloved children. It is with His Ancient Words that He changes you; It is with His Ancient Words that He changed me.

Perhaps this thought is particularly special to me because the very first Bible study I ever attended was a study of Ezra and Nehemiah. These two books of the Old Testament are the story the Israelites’ return from exile in Babylon and the rebuilding of Jerusalem. That study was the beginning of God changing me from an exile in the wasteland of depression into the confident woman of faith that I have become. It is because of my desire to learn from His Ancient Words that He has been able to effect such a huge change in me.

How about you? Do you feel a bit like you are in exile, lost and broken? Trust in God and seek Him with all your heart. Study and learn His Ancient Words and He will change you, too.

7 Comments

Filed under Faith, Jesus, Life, Music, postaday2011, Women