Tag Archives: Revelation

Who Was, Who Is, and Who Is to Come

“Yesterday is but today’s memory, and tomorrow is today’s dream.” ~Kahlil Gibran

You are the God who was so I’ll remember blessings of the past, often cast as woes and suffering amassed as memories unforgotten. Sometimes I dream that the past was perfect, filled with only laughter and merriment, but alas it was not. Still You were there. You are the God who is so I’ll trust that what You bless won’t turn to rust or cosmic dust. Sometimes I worry that I’ve wasted today, that my gift of the present will become another memory of woe. But then I remember who You are, today. You are the God who is to come so I believe all my days You’ll weave into an exquisite tapestry to which I’ll cleave. One day that tapestry will be but a memory, but a beautiful one as seen through Your eyes. You are God the Almighty, Alpha and Omega, beginning and the end, yet You call me friend and for eternity my dream of mercy defend.

Yesterday is gone
Today I dream in wonder
Tomorrow will come


This haibun is doing double duty. I’m sharing it for Haibun Monday #2 at dVerse Poets Pub, and I’m using it as my Blogging U Writing 201 Lesson #3 that calls for writing prose poetry with internal rhyme (with the added prompt of skin, which I chose to not incorporate).


Filed under Blogging, Faith, Jesus, Life, Poetry

My Simple Life

The Day 26 prompt at NaPoWriMo today (where incidentally my post of yesterday was featured) is to write a persona poem, which is a poem in the voice of someone else. I chose to write in the voice of John, the disciple whom Jesus loved, and who penned the Gospel of John, 3 epistles, and Revelation.

My Simple Life

Mine was a simple life
Catching fish with my dad and brother
Going to the synagogue on the Sabbath
Always honoring my dear sweet mother

Along comes this Nazarene
He wants James and me to be fishers of men
I don’t really understand quite what he means
Yet we drop everything to follow him then

Life is still simple, but not the same
We follow him as he teaches us about God
The Pharisees and Priests don’t like him at all
They try to trick him, call him a fraud

But the miracles he performs
Make me believe he’s Messiah
He fed 5,000, calmed a storm, healed the sick
He must be the one foretold by Jeremiah

All the prophets predicted
He would come to rescue us one day
I can’t hardly believe it’s happening in my time
After Israel for centuries from God did stray

When I saw him transform
On the mountain he became a magnificent light
Peter and James saw it too, we were frightened
We knew we had seen a glorious sight

I trust him with my life
He calls me the disciple whom he does love
Even when I vie for first place in his band
Of disciples who sometimes push and shove

Now he tells us he’s the lamb
Fulfilling the Passover his body is given
We don’t understand what he’s saying
That through him all our sins are forgiven

He prays in the garden
Where we often come to pray together
But this prayer is different, such anguish
Still we fall asleep, lulled by the weather

He’s arrested and we flee
By the Sanhedrin he’s unfairly and illegally tried
Handed over to the Romans for punishment
And Pilate decrees he be unjustly crucified

I stood at the cross
Bewildered by this unexpected turn of events
As he prays for the Father to forgive them
Not one among the Sanhedrin repents

They thought that it was over
They buried him in a borrowed garden tomb
But he promised he’d return and he did
He left the grave like a baby from the womb

After he appeared to us
He returned to his heavenly throne
Then he sent us the great Counselor
As he promised not to leave us alone

Many years later on Patmos
In exile I am given a vision of his grace
He will come again to rescue his people
All sin, pain, and tears he will erase


Filed under Faith, Jesus, Life, Poetry


The Poetics prompt over at dVerse Poets Pub today is to write about a city or cities. I tried to think of something to write about my own city or about trips I’ve made to other big cities, like New York or San Francisco. But my mind wouldn’t stay there. I kept coming back to Jerusalem—a city I’ve never been to but would love to visit some day. A friend was recently there and her pictures on Facebook made me want to go all the more.


Jerusalem, Jerusalem
City where my Savior died
I pray you find His peace

Jerusalem, Jerusalem
Ancient city from of old
I pray God’s blessing on you

Jerusalem, Jerusalem
A city exiled to Babylon
I pray your safe return

Jerusalem, Jerusalem
The city with many enemies
I pray protection for your people

Jerusalem, Jerusalem
A new city you’ll one day be
I pray the Lord’s return


Filed under Faith, Jesus, Poetry

Heaven Is My Home

The Poetics prompt over at dVerse Poetry Pub today was to write about a fantasy world. Being ever the rebel, I decided to write about a real world that many think is mere fantasy.

Heaven Is My Home

Streets of gold
No sun, moon, or stars
because Jesus himself is
all the Light that’s needed

Some say it’s a fantasy
Pie in the sky when you die
but I know in my heart it’s real
Heaven is my home

Joy abounds
No pain, tears, or sin
because Jesus himself paid
the price and made all right

Some say it’s a fantasy
Pie in the sky when you die
but I know in my soul it’s real
Heaven is my home

God’s throne of
ruby and jasper, flashes
of lightening surround Jesus
the Lamb upon His throne

Some say it’s a fantasy
Pie in the sky when you die
but I know in my heart it’s real
Heaven is my home

Cherubim, seraphim
Living creatures like lions,
ox, and eagle covered in eyes
singing Holy, Holy, Holy

Some say it’s a fantasy
Pie in the sky when you die
but I know in my soul it’s real
Heaven is my home

And forever I will sing
Holy, Holy, Holy
to the Lamb who was slain
because Jesus is my King



Filed under Faith, Jesus, Life, Poetry

Knock at the Door – A Trireme Sonnet

Joy, where’s my joy, I’m always wanting more
Lord, bring me peace and comfort is my plea
I find only stress and fear in this place

Soft knocking, I hear knocking at the door
A sound so sweet, it’s beckoning to me
I peer through the window, see His sweet face

He enters, in awe I fall to the floor
He bids me arise, all my fear does flee
I find myself in His heartfelt embrace

I found my joy in the One I adore
From the shackles of sin He set me free
We dine in the miracle of His grace

Finally I trust I will win the race
My Savior is here with me in this place
Jesus Knocking

Last Thursday Sam Peralta shared a lesson on the trireme sonnet for the dVerse Poets Pub FormForAll. I didn’t have time to write one before the link box for that post expired, but I had one on mind that included Sam’s extra challenge to make it an ekphrastic poem, meaning it is inspired by a picture or painting. I plan on sharing this for Open Linke Night at dVerse later today.

I’ve included here the painting that inspired this poem. It is an old painting on a burl of Jesus standing at a door knocking. This particular painting of this scene, which is based on Revelation 3:20, used to hang in my in-laws house, but they gave it to us last year so now it is in my living room.


Filed under Faith, Jesus, Life, Poetry

This Is My Gift to My King

Today is Epiphany. This morning on our way to church I said to my son, “Yesterday was the 12th day of Christmas and today is Epiphany.” He replied, “Did you just realize that?” Clearly his gift is a quick wit among other creative talents.

Epiphany is the church holiday in which we celebrate the Magi from the east visiting the child Jesus. They brought Him gifts of gold, frankincense, and myrrh, but before they bestowed these gifts on the young Jesus they offered Him their worship. The Magi worshipped Jesus not for what He had done for them but simply because of who He is. The story of their visit is recorded in Matthew 2:1-12.

In church this morning our pastor talked about the significance of the three gifts the Magi brought, and then he asked what gifts we can give to Jesus. I decided I would share the significance of the Magi’s gifts, as well as my thoughts on my gifts to my King.

The first gift of the Magi was gold. This was the customary gift given to kings. This gift points to Jesus as being a king from His very birth. He is the highest of royalty. The Magi sought Him as the King of the Jews. He is ultimately revealed to be King of kings: “On his robe and on his thigh he has this name written: KING OF KINGS AND LORD OF LORDS.” Revelation 19:16 (NIV).

The second gift of the Magi was frankincense or incense. It was customary for priests to use incense in the temple as part of their worship of God. It was the priests who presented sacrifices in the temple to atone for the sins of the people. But these sacrifices were only temporarily effective for that purpose and had to be repeated over and over. This gift of incense points to Jesus as the final priest. “Therefore, since we have a great high priest who has gone through the heavens, Jesus the Son of God, let us hold firmly to the faith we profess.” Hebrews 4:14 (NIV). He has been our sacrifice once for all to atone for the sins of the world.

This third gift of the Magi was myrrh. This is a spice that was used in burial. This points to Jesus as a prophet who will be killed for preaching the truth just as the prophets of the Old Testament were killed. Jesus said, “O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, you who kill the prophets and stone those sent to you, how often I have longed to gather your children together, as a hen gathers her chicks under her wings, but you were not willing.” Matthew 23:37 (NIV). Jesus knew that He would be treated just as the prophets were. He was born for this purpose — that He would die and be buried with myrrh to atone for our sins. But praise God, He rose again.

So what then is my gift to my King? What can I give that is worthy of His glory? First of all I give my worship of Him simply for who He is and not for what He has or will do for me. I can give my time and myself. As I listened to the sermon this morning, though, it occurred to me that one of the greatest gifts I can give to Jesus is this blog. As I write to glorify His name and to share His mercy and love with others, I hope that this gift is pleasing to Him so that someday I will hear Him say, “Well done, good and faithful servant.” Matthew 25:21 (NIV).

What gift will you bring to the throne of the King?


Filed under Faith, Family, Jesus, Life, Service

Advent and the Second Coming

The season of Advent is about anticipating our celebration of the coming of Christ into the world. But it is also about anticipating His second coming into the world at the end of time. For that reason, our pastor gave a sermon yesterday titled “End Times – A Lutheran Perspective.”

It was a very interesting and informative sermon. He talked about the many attempts of mankind and the church to predict the exact time when the end will come, even though Jesus clearly said, “No one knows about that day or hour, not even the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but only the Father.” Matthew 24:36, Mark 13:32.

He also talked about the various perspectives on the end times and the thousand-year reign of Jesus written about in Revelation. There is the pre-millennial view that the thousand-year reign hasn’t yet started. There is the post-millennial view that the thousand-year reign has already passed. And there is the amillennial view that the thousand years is a figurative timeframe instead of a literal one.

But the most important thing our pastor said during the whole sermon took up only six little words: “This is not a salvation issue.

Whether you believe the rapture and tribulation are still to come, that the church is experiencing the tribulation now, or something else does not affect whether you have salvation in Christ. What matters is if you believe God came to this earth as Emmanuel and then died on a cross to pay for your sins.

For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life. John 3:16 (NIV)


Filed under Faith, Jesus, Life

My Favorite Song to Sing

Just before bed last night I decided to check Facebook one last time. The “I Love God” page that I like had posted one of my favorite songs from scripture. It appears in both the Old Testament and the New Testament. (Just one more example of how they are two parts of a whole!)

The first place where this song is found is in Isaiah 6:1-3:

In the year that King Uzziah died, I saw the Lord seated on a throne, high and exalted, and the train of his robe filled the temple. Above him were seraphs, each with six wings: With two wings they covered their faces, with two they covered their feet, and with two they were flying. And they were calling to one another:
        “Holy, holy, holy is the Lord Almighty;
the whole earth  is full of his glory.”

The second place where this song is found is in Revelation 4:6-10:

In the center, around the throne, were four living creatures, and they were covered with eyes, in front and in back.The first living creature was like a lion, the second was like an ox, the third had a face like a man, the fourth was like a flying eagle. Each of the four living creatures  had six wings  and was covered with eyes all around,  even under his wings. Day and night  they never stop saying:

“Holy, holy, holy
is the Lord God Almighty,
who was, and is, and is to come.”

Whenever the living creatures give glory, honor and thanks to him who sits on the throne   and who lives for ever and ever, the twenty-four elders  fall down before him  who sits on the throne,  and worship him who lives for ever and ever. They lay their crowns before the throne and say:
“You are worthy, our Lord and God, to receive glory and honor and power, for you created all things, and by your will they were created and have their being.”

This reminded me of a song I had heard earlier in the day while I was listening to my iPod Christian playlist on shuffle as I put groceries away. It’s called One Day by Aaron Shust. I decided I wanted to share this song for Music Monday. It doesn’t really need any commentary. Its simple praise of our Holy God speaks for itself.


Filed under Faith, Jesus, Life, Music

Grace Is Not New

Many characterize the Old Testament as a book of God’s wrath and the New Testament as a book of God’s grace. But as I read the whole of scripture, I find grace and wrath throughout. There is grace for the humble and wrath for the proud in the Old Testament and the New Testament. Two translations of a verse from Proverbs illustrate this truth.

Though He scoffs at the scoffers,
Yet He gives grace to the afflicted.
Proverbs 3:34 (NASB).

He mocks proud mockers
but gives grace to the humble.
Proverbs 3:34 (NIV)

This Old Testament verse is quoted twice in the New Testament, in James 4:6 and in 1 Peter 5:5. In quoting this Proverb, James and Peter are teaching the new church that humility is at the core of the Gospel of grace that they preach. We trust in the atoning sacrifice of Christ because we know we are unworthy to be able to earn God’s grace on our own. The proud, who believe they do not need Christ, remain under the wrath of God.

There have always been scoffers and proud mockers who deny the majesty of God. Until Jesus returns there will continue to be. These scoffers say that our faith is futile and useless because God does not exist, or if He does then He surely does not care about us mere mortals.

But there have also always been the humble, those who desire to know God and trust in His grace and strength. And as much as the mockers would like to think humble believers in Christ will someday cease to exist, that all religion will one day be irrelevant, we will survive because God has granted us grace and mercy.

I sometimes think about all the people who lived before Jesus walked the earth and wonder what their eternal fate was. They could not have trusted in the saving grace of Jesus’ sacrifice on the cross, because it had not yet happened. And yet I cannot help but believe that His blood covers the humble and afflicted of the Old Testament. It’s the ultimate time paradox – one that, for me, is answered by the timelessness of our dear Savior.

“Jesus Christ is the same yesterday and today and forever.” Hebrews 13:8 (NIV). He lives outside the bounds of linear time as we experience it. His grace is sufficient for the humble who trust in Him.

“I am the Alpha and the Omega,” says the Lord God, “who is, and who was, and who is to come, the Almighty.” Revelation 1:8 (NIV).


Filed under Faith, Jesus, Life

Silence – A Double Triolet

In our world today it seems that there is constant sound. We have such a hard time being silent and just sitting quietly in the presence of God. Even a moment of silence and we seem compelled to fill it up with some type of noise. You can hear it in many public speakers who fill every moment of their presentation with “ums” and “aahs” rather than pause for even a few seconds to think about what they will say next. You can see it in our young people who walk around with headphones in their ears listening to something, anything, from their iPods rather than listen to silence.

But silence truly is, as the saying goes, golden. It is not something to be feared, avoided, or filled with noise. Silence is heavenly and divine.


There is a time for everything under heaven
A time to be silent and a time to speak
As a sheep being sheared is silent, Jesus remained silent
There is a time for everything under heaven

He was oppressed and afflicted, crushed for our iniquity
Yet he did not open his mouth, Jesus gave no answer
There is a time for everything under heaven
A time to be silent and a time to speak

There was silence in heaven for about half an hour
When the Lamb of God opened the seventh seal
As incense and prayers of the saints rose to the Lord
There was silence in heaven for about half an hour

The LORD is in his holy temple; let all the earth be silent
Be silent, for the day of the Sovereign LORD is near
There was silence in heaven for about half an hour
When the Lamb of God opened the seventh seal

Note: This double triolet is also a “found” poem as it all comes from God’s Word. The verse that inspired this poem is Revelation 8:1 – “When he opened the seventh seal, there was silence in heaven for about half an hour.” It occurred to me that if heaven can remain silent for half an hour, perhaps silence truly is a good thing.

I also wrote this poem for Open Link Night at dVerse Poets Pub. Find a quiet place and check out the other poems offered there.


Filed under Faith, Jesus, Life, Poetry